For a standout title, try using large monogram letters for your entire title.  I used Basic Grey undressed chipboard monograms for these layouts.  (Note: chipboard that is plain and unfinished is often called undressed, bare, or naked.)  For extra letters, you can trace on chipboard and cut them out.  Next, I traced the letters on cardstock, cut out, embellished, and glued to the chipboard.  Be sure to embellish the letters before adhering to the chipboard.  The ways to embellish these monograms are endless.  You can use buttons, brads, eyelets, snaps, rivets, charms, ribbon, fiber, clips, staples, tags, diecuts, etc.  You can also use techniques such as stamping, stitching, inking, distressing, doodling, etc.  My favorite adhesive when using chipboard is Liquid Glass by CTMH.  There is a bit of drying time involved but it will hold forever!

I absolutely love how these frames turned out and they are just what I wanted to display in my scrapbook room.  I made one for each of my daughter’s with some of my favorite pictures of them.  They each helped choose the paper for their frame.  The frames have an easel on the back and a hook for hanging.  I have mine hung because I need all the extra desk space I can get in my scrapbook room.  They do hang out a bit from the wall because of the easel.  The frames are Bare Elements by Creative Imagination and I can’t wait to try more of their products.

For Christine’s frame, I used Making Memories acrylic paint (chocolate) and painted the edges of the frame (under the paper is white, no need to waste).  Next I cut the patterned paper to fit the frame, marked the center square on the back and used an exacto knife to cut out the center.  This takes a bit of measuring.  The paper is Die Cuts With a View from the Glitter Stack.  It adds a lot of sparkle and dimension on it’s own, which was perfect for this project.  Next, I adhered the paper and her name.  I used Mod Podge (I prefer matte) as my adhesive and also added a coat to the top to protect it.  Note: When using Mod Podge, apply in thin coats and be sure to let the bottom coat (under your paper) dry before applying a coat overtop.  The letters are Silver Glitter Alphabet Chipboard by K&Co.  The glitter was coming off some of the letters so I sealed them with a layer of Mod Podge and it worked like magic.  I painted the chipboard flourish with MM paint (capri) and added a couple coats of MM Specialty Glaze – Glitter.  It’s hard to see from the photo but it adds a nice extra touch.  I finished it off with the flowers using silver brads in the center and adhering with glue dots.

For Steph’s frame I left the outside white, which is how it comes.  This eliminated the first step of painting.  The paper again is DCWV and I painted the flourish using MM (sky) paint and the glitter glaze.  I wish I knew what these chipboard letters are because the glitter on them is sealed very well and I really like them.  If you recognize them please let me know.  The brad in the center of the flower is a Bazzill Really Big Brad.  I rubbed it on a glue pad and then sprinkled glitter over it.  After that was dry I added a coat of Mod Podge overtop to seal it.

This originally was an advertising box that came in the mail, I think with CDs in it.  I don’t even remember anymore what it first looked like.  I knew when I got it though that it should be altered as opposed to thrown away.  It’s amazing what a little acrylic paint can do.  I painted it, covered it with paper and pictures using Mod Podge, added embellishments and rub-ons and turned this trash into a treasure!

Ahh, two of my favorite things!!  I did this layout the other day and didn’t have any brown brads for the centers of my flowers.  As an alternative, I used just a drop of acrylic paint for the center.  These are fairly small flowers and I only needed a small drop so when you try this the first time you may need to practice on a couple.  It is an inexpensive way to match your layout perfectly and those acrylic paints we have sitting on our shelves.

Here is the complete layout (made with all scraps too!):

Altered clipboards are a great gift for kids.  They are inexpensive and fun to make.  All the kids I have made them for love them.

Supplies needed: Clipboard, ModPodge (comes in glossy or matte, I prefer matte), paper and/or paint, stamps and/or embellishments, fibers/ribbon, exacto knife, and a pen.  A brayer is helpful but not required.

Directions:
1. Sometimes the top clip on the clipboard will screw off.  If it does, take it off for easier decorating.  If not, you can work around it by planning a design where you paint the top part and/or have a straight paper line.
2. Chose papers, colors, and embellishments for your clipboard.  Make a rough draft drawing or have a design idea in your head.  When chosing a design, remember to keep the majority of the main surface flat because it will be used for writing.  Because of this stamping is a great choice of embellishing.  Keep stickers in the corners.
3. Any areas that will be painted should be done first.  I like to paint the side/edge of the clipboard for a more finished look.
4. Next cover with your chosen paper.  Use the Mod Podge as your adhesive, applying a thin coate to the clipboard.  Use a foam brush for complete coverage and don’t worry applying the Mod Podge beyond where you are placing the paper.  Place the paper on the clipboard and use a brayer to roll over the top of the paper so that it is secure.  Let dry.
5. Flip the clipboard over and using the exacto knife, trim the paper around the clipboard.
6. Stamp, embellish as desired.  Mod Podge works well as an adhesive for diecuts and paper flowers like in my examples.
7. Cover the entire clipboard with two thin layers of Mod Podge.  Let dry between coats to avoid bubbling.  Also, apply the Mod Podge well around the edges of the chipboard.  This will give it a more finished look and ensure that the paper you’ve applied is secure.  (If it starts coming loose, what kid won’t pull/pick at it until it comes apart.)
8. Use ribbon or fiber to tie a pen to the clipboard.  Make sure it is long enough for comfortable writing.

Tip: To avoid bubbles when using Mod Podge (as shown on Stephanie’s clipboard) remember two things.  1) Use thing coats.  Don’t worry – It will stick and too much is not a good thing.  2) Give plenty of drying time between coats, especially when you’ve used it as an adhesive underneath and before applying the top protective coat.  If you do get a small bubble, you can try to roll it out with the brayer.  If that doesn’t work just leave it.  You will do more damage than good and the great news is that I have had this happen and after it dries the bubble disappears!